Gina Rinehart enjoys a glass of champagne

Article by Mary Mrad courtesy of the Daily Mail Australia.

Gina Rinehart dressed to impress as she attended the Brisbane Fashion Festival on Wednesday.

The 67-year-old looked stylish in an all-white ensemble as she sat in the front row and enjoyed a glass of champagne.

The mining magnate wore stylish white pants, a matching coloured shirt and coat at the event.

Gina teamed the ensemble with a pair of strappy heels and wore pearl earrings.

She kept her short brunette locks out and wore a white silk face mask as she arrived to the fashion festival.

Earlier this month, it was revealed Gina had quietly funded many of the sportsmen and women at the Tokyo Olympics so they could chase their dreams.

The likes of veteran swimmer Cate Campbell, rowing gold medallist Lucy Stephan, and silver medallist beach volleyballer Taliqua Clancy were all funded by the generous Rinehart.

‘I don’t say this lightly, but Gina Rinehart saved swimming,’ three-time Tokyo medallist Campbell told the Australian Financial Review.

‘She made funds available that went directly to athletes. This allowed many athletes – myself included – to see that there was a future career in swimming.’

In swimming, Rinehart’s funding is tier in operation depending on the status of the athlete.
Stylish: The mining magnate wore stylish white pants, a matching coloured shirt and coat at the event

Campbell added her numerous commercial sponsorships help to pay the bills, but Rinehart’s injection of funds provides other athletes with financial stability and the ability to plan for the future.

Gold medal-winning rower Lucy Stephan said the win of her coxless four team would have been a pipe dream without Rinehart’s support.

She was struggling to pay her rent and even moved in with a friend’s mother before Rinehart intervened.

According to The Australian, Ms Rinehart contributes up to $10million each year to athletes preparing for the Games across multiple sports.

Supportive: It comes after it was revealed Gina had quietly funded many of the sportsmen and women at the Tokyo Olympics so they could chase their dreams